Re-imagining Agric Research

“@SHallWorldfish: To reduce poverty & hunger globally we need to re-imagine agricultural research in development http://t.co/BuX8uqi2 #AgRinD #Ag4Dev”

Posted in Biodiversity & farming, Food Security, ICT4 Agric Dev, Small holder farmers, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Urban farming and container gardening against hunger (Africa54 / FAO)

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Read at :

Africa54 (see my Blogroll)

FAO Newsroom

http://www.fao.org/newsroom/en/news/2007/1000484/index.html 

Urban farming against hunger

Safe, fresh food for city dwellers

1 February 2007, Rome – The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization has opened a new front in its battle against hunger and malnutrition – in the world’s cities where most of global population growth is set to take place over the next decades.  “Urban agriculture” may seem a contradiction, but that is what FAO is supporting as one element in urban food supply systems in response to the surging size of the cities of the developing world – and to their fast-advancing slums – according to Alison Hodder, senior horticulturist with the Crop and Grassland Service.

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Tree lucerne (Cytisus proliferus) is a key supplementary feed for ruminant animals particularly in dry seasons

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Photo credit: Google

Tree lucerne a promising animal feed option for Ethiopia farmers

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Agricultural water productivity for sustainable development

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Photo credit: IWMI

Sprinkler irrigation used in Eastern Highlands on the Mozambique border to irrigate farms. Photo: David Brazier / IWMI

The “biography” of a bold idea

Adoption of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has added new impetus to the far-reaching concept of agricultural water productivity. This is the idea that raising farm outputs or their value relative to the amount of water used in agriculture, by far the world’s biggest water consumer, is critical to address water scarcity.

SDG 6 (“ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all”) includes a target (6.4) to “substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors.” For the first time, efficient water use has gained a prominent place on the international development agenda.

fulani-farmer-abdullah-ahjedis-daughter-demonstrating-how-she-takes-readings-from-rain-guage Fulani farmer Abdullah Ahjedi’s daughter demonstrating how she takes readings from rain guage. Photo: Thor Windham-Wright / IWMI – http://g9jzk5cmc71uxhvd44wsj7zyx.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/fulani-farmer-abdullah-ahjedis-daughter-demonstrating-how-she-takes-readings-from-rain-guage.jpg

Bringing the idea to life

To help…

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Latest Brussels Briefing 47: “Regional Trade in Africa: Drivers, Trends and Opportunities”

Brussels Development Briefings

The Brussels Development Briefing n.47 on the subject of “Regional Trade in Africa: Drivers, Trends and Opportunities” took place on 3rd February 2017 in Brussels at the ACP Secretariat (Avenue Georges Henri 451, 1200 Brussels) from 09:00 to 13:00.  This Briefing was organised by the ACP-EU Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA), in collaboration with IFPRI, the European Commission / DEVCO, the ACP Secretariat, and CONCORD .

Webstream: Click here to watch the event live
View the coverage on Twitter: @BruBriefings and using hashtag #BB47

Trade and regional integration have dominated the political agenda in recent years, with scores of countries pursuing trade agreements under various configurations. There is a renewed focus on the role of the private sector, and on reducing and eliminating trade barriers in order to boost economic growth by encouraging more trade and investment. The nexus between trade, integration and development is recognised to hold…

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Livestock feeds and forages – highlights from ILRI’s corporate report 2015–2016

ILRI news

The highly nutritious Brachiaria grass (situated in the centre of the photo) thrives all year round, providing a constant supply of animal feed. Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu) The highly nutritious Brachiaria grass (situated in the centre of the photo) thrives all year round, providing a constant supply of animal feed. Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu)

The experience of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and partner scientists in 2015–2016 shows the positive benefits of implementing pioneering research and development interventions that increase the overall quantity and nutritional quality of feed biomass and help smooth seasonal feed variability, creating sustainable livelihood opportunities for smallholder livestock keepers. But the real scope for spreading the knowledge in this research lies in the development of on- and off-line tools that can be used by isolated smallholder farmers to access approaches for assessing feed constraints and developing effective feed and forage improvement interventions.

These are the findings from the feeds and forages research and interventions, presented in the ILRI Corporate report 2015–2016: highlights on livestock feeds and forages. These findings are…

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It’s possible to achieve accelerated rates of yield gain, but more research and development are required.

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cereals_africa_trends_en-2-768x517 To satisfy the enormous increase in demand for food in sub-Saharan Africa until 2050, cereal yields must increase to 80 percent of their potential. This calls for a drastic trend break. Graphic courtesy of Wageningen University – http://www.cimmyt.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cereals_africa_trends_EN-2-768×517.jpg

Can sub-Saharan Africa meet its future cereal food requirement?

Sub-Saharan Africa will need to transform and intensify crop production to avoid over-reliance on imports and meet future food security needs, according to a new report.

Recent studies have focused on the global picture, anticipating that food demand will grow 60 percent by 2050 as population soars to 9.7 billion, and hypothesizing that the most sustainable solution is to close the yield gap on land already used for crop production.

Yet, although it is essential to close the yield gap, which is defined as the difference between yield potential and actual farm yield, cereal demand will likely not be met without taking…

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Drought-tolerant crops can end Africa’s food insecurity (Google / New Vision)

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Read at : Google Alert – drought

http://www.newvision.co.ug/D/8/459/699460

Drought-tolerant crops can end Africa’s food insecurity

By Dr. Daniel Mataruka

A crisis is looming over the small-scale farms of Africa. Experts agree that climate change is manifesting itself in the form of prolonged drought in many parts of Africa. This is having a devastating impact on millions of resource-poor, small-scale farmers. And yet, for the first time in history, we have solutions in hand that can help these farmers cope with the effects of drought.

We can prepare them for climate change by rapidly increasing the development and use of drought-tolerant crops in Africa. We know how to do this. We just need the political will to get it done.

The choices we make now and in the coming years will determine how quickly these new crop varieties can be put into the hands of Africa’s farmers, helping to…

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